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[29 Jan 2016 | Comments Off on Taking Culture Seriously: The challenges of data sharing | ]
Taking Culture Seriously: The challenges of data sharing

I promised some thinking out loud and likely naive and uninformed opinion in my plans for the new year. Here’s a start on that with apologies to Science and Technology Studies and Cultural Studies people who’ve probably thought all of this through. Yes, I am trying to get people to do my due diligence literature review for me.
It’s a common strand when we talk about improving data sharing or data management, or access to research, or public engagement…or… “Cultural Change, its hard”. The capitals are deliberate. Cultural Change is seen …

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[28 Jan 2016 | Comments Off on Where are the pipes? Building Foundational Infrastructures for Future Services | ]
Where are the pipes? Building Foundational Infrastructures for Future Services

Cite as “Bilder G, Lin J, Neylon C (2016) Where are the pipes? Building Foundational Infrastructures for Future Services, retrieved [date], http://cameronneylon.net/blog/where-are-the-pipes-building-foundational-infrastructures-for-future-services/ ‎”
You probably don’t think too much about where all the services to your residence run. They go missing from view until something goes wrong. But how do we maintain them unless they are identified? An entire utilities industry, which must search for utility infrastructure, hangs in the balance on this knowledge. There’s even an annual competition, a rodeo no less, to crown the best infrastructure locators in the land, rewarding those …

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[13 Jan 2016 | One Comment | ]

I’m not much for end of year or beginning of year posts but I have found that putting down plans is a good way of holding myself to account (and that a few people out there might help with that job…you know who you are). I also think my use of this space may change a little over the coming year, so for those of you still using RSS (yes! we do still exist!) this may have an impact on including me or not in your selection for 2016.
As it …

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[12 Jan 2016 | Comments Off on Making it personal: The rare disease literature sucks | ]
Making it personal: The rare disease literature sucks

I’ve been engaged in different ways with some people in the rare genetic disease community for a few years. In most cases the initial issue that brought us together was access to literature and in some cases that lead towards Open Science issues more generally. Many people in the Open Access space have been motivated by personal stories and losses, and quite a few of those relate to rare genetic diseases.
I’ve heard, and relayed to others how access has been a problem, how the structure and shape of the literature …

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[7 Jan 2016 | One Comment | ]

Eight publishers will move to require ORCIDs for corresponding authors as part of the submission requirements for submitting articles.
It seems like a very long time ago that I got involved in the efforts to develop an ID system for contributors to research outputs. A post from 2009 seems to be the earliest I wrote about it alongside a summary from a few weeks later (ironically, given the discussion a summary for which most of the links are broken). I’ve been doing a lot of looking at old posts recently and those …

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[28 Dec 2015 | 4 Comments | ]

Standard Analytics have released a very useful paper looking at platform costs for scholarly publishing. In the paper (which coincidentally demonstrates part of the platform system they are developing) they make some strong claims about the base cost of publishing scholarly articles. In this post I will critique those claims and attempt to derive a cost that fully represents the base marginal cost of article publishing, while pointing out that such average estimates are probably not very useful. The central point is that the paper shows not marginal costs but (a …

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[30 Nov 2015 | One Comment | ]

This is an approximation of my talk at OpenCon Cambridge on Thursday 26 November 2015. Any inaccuracies entirely mine. There is also a video recording of the actual talk.
The idea of OpenCon was borne out of the idea that the future belonged to young scholars and that helping them to be effective advocates for the world they want to work in was the best way to make progress. With that in mind I wanted to reflect not on the practical steps, of which there will be much more this afternoon, …

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[29 Nov 2015 | One Comment | ]
The end of the journal? What has changed, what stayed the same?

This is an approximate rendering of my comments as part of the closing panel of “The End of Scientific Journal? Transformations in Publishing” held at the Royal Society, London on 27 November 2015. It should be read as a reconstruction of what I might have said rather than an accurate record. The day had focussed on historical accounts of “journals” as mediators of both professional and popular research communications. A note of the meeting will be published. Our panel was set the question of “will the journal still exist in …

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[19 Nov 2015 | 6 Comments | ]
PolEcon of OA Publishing: What are the assets of a journal?

This post wasn’t on the original slate for the Political Economics of Publishing series but it seems apposite as the arguments and consequences of the Editorial Board of Lingua resigning en masse to form a new journal published by Ubiquity Press continue to rumble on.
The resignation of the editorial board of Lingua from the (Elsevier owned) journal to form a new journal, that is intended to really be “the same journal” raises interesting issues of ownership and messaging. Perhaps even more deeply it raises questions of what the real assets …

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[22 Oct 2015 | 8 Comments | ]

This is the approximate text of my talk at City University London on 21 October for Open Access Week 2015. If you prefer the “as live” video version then that its available at YouTube. Warning: Nearly 6000 words and I haven’t yet referenced it properly, put the pictures in or done a good edit…

Eight years of Open Access Week, massive progress towards greater access to research, not to mention data and educational resources. The technology landscape has shifted, the assessment landscape has shifted. The policy landscape has certainly shifted. And …