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Articles tagged with: open notebook science

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[17 Jul 2008 | Comments Off | 1 views]

I’m in Barcelona at a satellite meeting of the EuroScience Open Forum organised by Science Commons and a number of their partners.  Today is when most of the meeting will be with forums on ‘Open Access Today’, ‘Moving OA to the Scientific Enterprise:Data, materials, software’, ‘Open access in the the knowledge network’, and ‘Open society, open science: Principle and lessons from OA’. There is also a keynote from Carlos Morais-Pires of the European Commission and the lineup for the panels is very impressive.
Last night was an introduction and social kickoff …

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[28 May 2008 | 8 Comments | 64 views]

Regular readers will know I am a great believer in the potential of Web2.0 tools to enable rapid aggregation of loose networks of collaborators to solve a particular problem and the possibilities of using this approach to do science better, faster, and more efficiently. The reason why we haven’t had great successes on this thus far is fundamentally down to the size of the network we have in place and the bias in the expertise of that network towards specific areas. There is a strong bioinformatics/IT bias in the people …

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[16 May 2008 | 6 Comments | 13 views]

A story of two major retractions from a well known research group has been getting a lot of play over the last few days with a News Feature (1) and Editorial (2) in the 15 May edition of Nature. The story turns on claim that Homme Hellinga’s group was able to convert the E. coli ribose binding protein into a Triose phosphate isomerase (TIM) using a computational design strategy. Two papers on the work appeared, one in Science (3) and one in J Mol Biol (4). However another group, having …

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[29 Apr 2008 | 4 Comments | 18 views]

One of the strong messages that came back from the workshop we held at the BioSysBio meeting was that protocols and standards of behaviour were something that people would appreciate having available. There are many potential issues that are raised by the idea of a ‘charter’ or ‘protocol’ for open science but these are definitely things that are worth talking about. I thought I would through a few ideas out and see where they go. There are some potentially serious contradictions to be worked through.
One of the strong messages that …

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[27 Apr 2008 | 6 Comments | 6 views]

I am thinking about how to present the case for Open Science, Open Notebook Science, and Open Data at Science in the 21st Century, the meeting being organised by Sabine Hossenfelder and Michael Nielsen at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics. I’ve put up a draft abstract and as you might guess from this I wanted to make an economic case that the waste of resources, both human and monetary is not something that is sustainable for the future. Here I want to rehearse that argument a bit further as …

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[23 Apr 2008 | 2 Comments | 11 views]

Image via Wikipedia
This has taken me longer than expected to write up. Julius Lucks, John Cumbers, and myself lead a workshop on Open Science on Monday 21st at the BioSysBio meeting at Imperial College London.  I had hoped to record screencast, audio, and possibly video as well but in the end the laptop I am working off couldn’t cope with both running the projector and Camtasia at the same time with reasonable response rates (its a long story but in theory I get my ‘proper’ laptop back tomorrow so hopefully …

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[8 Apr 2008 | 6 Comments | 3 views]

Perimeter Institute by hungryhungrypixels (Picture found by Zemanta).
Sabine Hossenfelder and Michael Nielsen of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics are organising a conference called ‘Science in the 21st Century‘ which was inspired in part by SciBarCamp. I am honoured, and not a little daunted, to have been asked to speak considering the star studded line up of speakers including, well lots of really interesting people, read the list. The meeting looks to be a really interesting mix of science, tools, and how these interact with people (and scientists). I’m looking …

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[3 Apr 2008 | 14 Comments | 15 views]

A whole series of things have converged in the last couple of days for me. First was Jean-Claude’s description of the work [1, 2] he and Brent Friesen of the Dominican University are doing putting the combi-Ugi project into an undergraduate laboratory setting. The students will make new compounds which will then be sent for testing as antimalarial agents by Phil Rosenthal at UCSF. This is a great story and a testament in particular to Brent’s work to make the laboratory practical more relevant and exciting for his students.
At the …

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[4 Mar 2008 | 10 Comments | 9 views]

Two things last week gave me more cause to think a bit harder about the RSS feeds from our LaBLog and how we can use them. First, when I gave my talk at UKOLN I made a throwaway comment about search and aggregation. I was arguing that the real benefits of open practice would come when we can use other people’s filters and aggregation tools to easily access the science that we ought to be seeing. Google searching for a specific thing isn’t enough. We need to have an aggregated …

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[6 Feb 2008 | 4 Comments | 2 views]

One thing that we have been thinking about a bit recently is how best to link elements of a peer reviewed paper back to an Open Notebook. There are a number of issues that this raises, both technical and philosophical about how and why we might do this. Our first motivation is to provide access to the raw data if people want it. The dream here is that by clicking on a graph you are taken straight through to processed data which you can then backtrack through to get to …