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About

This blog contains the thoughts of Cameron Neylon on the technical and social issues involved with ‘Open Research’. Most people would agree Open Research includes freely accessible literature or perhaps making raw data available. Others might think it also involves people working on collaborative documents such as Wikis or the freedom to re-use the published literature or data. At its logical extreme Open Research includes making all the details of what we do freely available as it happens. Many people find this scarey. Some, perhaps a growing number, find it tremendously exciting.

This site is a place for me to think through the technical problems and issues involved in electronically recording our work for publication on the web and the other social and logistical issues that are raised by making the science we do more immediately available and more connected to the world outside the laboratory.

I work for PLOS, the Open Access publisher and advocacy organisation where I am Advocacy Director.  Nothing written here should be taken or construed as PLOS policy or indicative of the tenor or direction of any internal discussions within PLOS.

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  • Sharon

    I’m looking for some resources or direction for diving into open notebook science. I have been interested in the concept for quite some time and recently began following this blog and a few others. I am excited to see that ONS is real and growing, but I’m not sure the best places to start. I want to find out what other folks are doing, what software they are using and what has and has not worked. I also would love to chat with anyone doing research with human subjects to figure out how IRB restrictions play out in ONS.

  • Sharon

    I’m looking for some resources or direction for diving into open notebook science. I have been interested in the concept for quite some time and recently began following this blog and a few others. I am excited to see that ONS is real and growing, but I’m not sure the best places to start. I want to find out what other folks are doing, what software they are using and what has and has not worked. I also would love to chat with anyone doing research with human subjects to figure out how IRB restrictions play out in ONS.

  • http://www.labmeeting.com/ Jeremy England

    I’m Jeremy, a grad student doing doctoral research in biophysics at Stanford. I have been working with some other students for a while now on Labmeeting.com, which is a web platform where biomedical researchers can organize their PDFs, share protocols etc. We think it is really important to get researchers comfortable with managing and sharing information online, so we are trying to build simple, free, web-based tools that individuals can use every day to help them in lab. We have gotten lots of positive feedback already, and we are eager to get the word out to more people. I encourage anyone interested in learning more to write to contact@labmeeting.com, or just to sign up and look around at http://www.labmeeting.com

  • http://www.labmeeting.com Jeremy England

    I’m Jeremy, a grad student doing doctoral research in biophysics at Stanford. I have been working with some other students for a while now on Labmeeting.com, which is a web platform where biomedical researchers can organize their PDFs, share protocols etc. We think it is really important to get researchers comfortable with managing and sharing information online, so we are trying to build simple, free, web-based tools that individuals can use every day to help them in lab. We have gotten lots of positive feedback already, and we are eager to get the word out to more people. I encourage anyone interested in learning more to write to contact@labmeeting.com, or just to sign up and look around at http://www.labmeeting.com

  • http://eugenic.wordpress.com/ Eugen

    Hello,
    I very much enjoy reading your blog.
    I am searching the net for a blog where researchers post their papers after those have been finished and styled, and getting feedback on their work. Has anyone tried to do that as an alternative to peer review?
    obviously these researchers would have to be independent or from outside the academia since they would not be getting any professional credit for their work if they don’t publish it in journals.
    I am especially interested in the humanities (Philosophy, Theology).

    Thank you,
    Eugen

  • http://eugenic.wordpress.com Eugen

    Hello,
    I very much enjoy reading your blog.
    I am searching the net for a blog where researchers post their papers after those have been finished and styled, and getting feedback on their work. Has anyone tried to do that as an alternative to peer review?
    obviously these researchers would have to be independent or from outside the academia since they would not be getting any professional credit for their work if they don’t publish it in journals.
    I am especially interested in the humanities (Philosophy, Theology).

    Thank you,
    Eugen

  • http://www.science.org/ Willam Lee

    Science.org is one of the largest informational databases and online news publication for anything and everything related to science and technology. It contains FREE information on science nuances and breaking technological/science news around the world. We offer this website to the public in efforts to increase the FREE flow of information and aid in forming a more knowledgeable public. We would like to offer you this site to be posted on your blog to offer the great information we’ve made available to your large public. We have reviewed the information on your blog and feel it is an excellent resource to any viewing public and admire the dedication you’ve put into it.
    We would love to include you within our network of featured resources, making your blog available to our public as well. We have included the code for the Science.org featured blogger award, you can post this on your site for your public’s viewing pleasure, recognizing your affiliation with Science.org. Thanks!
    Please reply back for further information

  • http://www.science.org Willam Lee

    Science.org is one of the largest informational databases and online news publication for anything and everything related to science and technology. It contains FREE information on science nuances and breaking technological/science news around the world. We offer this website to the public in efforts to increase the FREE flow of information and aid in forming a more knowledgeable public. We would like to offer you this site to be posted on your blog to offer the great information we’ve made available to your large public. We have reviewed the information on your blog and feel it is an excellent resource to any viewing public and admire the dedication you’ve put into it.
    We would love to include you within our network of featured resources, making your blog available to our public as well. We have included the code for the Science.org featured blogger award, you can post this on your site for your public’s viewing pleasure, recognizing your affiliation with Science.org. Thanks!
    Please reply back for further information